There has been much talk about practising good “sleep hygiene” in today’s technologically-driven society. From ensuring we do our daily dose of exercises to unwinding ourselves as part of our pre-bedtime routines, we may have checked all these activities off our sleep foolproof plan. If you are still wide awake at night, there may be something else that is affecting your sleep: being exposed to EMF radiation in your bedroom.      


What Is EMF (Electromagnetic Field)?


What is Electromagnetic Field

An electromagnetic field (EMF), or radiation, can occur naturally as well as coming from artificial sources. The sun sends out waves that create EMFs, which we see as visible light. Its energy radiates outwards, including in the form of ultraviolet (UV) rays. As industrialisation and technological advancement continue to expand, we are greeted with electric power lines, indoor lighting, microwave ovens, smartphones, computers, Wi-Fi routers and Bluetooth devices that are emitting EMFs similarly to how the sun does it. 


There are 2 types of EMF exposure: low-level radiation and high-level radiation. Electrical and electronic kitchen appliances, mobile phones and Wi-Fi routers produce low-level radiation, which is considered mild and harmless to the general population[1]. Meanwhile, high-level radiation found in the sun’s UV rays and X-rays may lead to the development of carcinogen-induced tumours in the human body[2].  

Read More: Does Your Bedroom Emits Radiation

How EMF Affects Your Sleep

How EMF Affects Our Sleep

EMF radiation can potentially decrease the production of melatonin, a hormone secreted by the pineal gland that is associated with control of the sleep-wake cycle. Not only is melatonin responsible for regulating one’s sleep-wake cycle, but it also acts as a powerful antioxidant to reduce the risks of cancer, mental health disorders in addition to slowing down the effects of ageing[3]. According to research concerning the relationship between EMFs and pineal melatonin level disruption, the pineal gland is said to perceive EMFs as light which may be the reason for the drop in melatonin production[4]


That being said, this makes us vulnerable to sleeping disorders as well as to life-threatening diseases when exposed to EMF long-term.


Tips for Lowering Your EMF Exposure in the Bedroom 

Even though our everyday usage of electrical and electronic devices causes minor inconveniences and disturbances such as insomnia, headache, tiredness and lack of concentration due to exposure to electromagnetic radiation, we should nevertheless attempt to minimise its side effects.

Below are some simple tips to decrease EMF exposure when you sleep: 

Turn off your mobile phone at night.

Turn off your mobile phone at night

Mobile phones communicate by emitting radio waves through base stations. The main effect of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields is the heating of body tissues. Long-term exposure to EMF radiation may lead to serious harmful effects like tissue damage on humans and pets in the household. Put your smartphone on “airplane mode” and disable the location option, or switch it off altogether when you are about to sleep to cut off the radio waves.  

Don’t charge your phone overnight at your bedside. 

No charging phone at your bedside

Starting the next day with a full battery is reassuring, but the radiation emitted while charging your phone throughout the night can disrupt your sleep patterns and damage the hardware. Charge your phone an hour before bedtime and refrain from picking it up to avoid endless browsing.   

Move your bed away from power plugs and sockets.

Move your bed away from power sockets

Rearrange your bedroom furniture to make space for your bed to be away from power plugs and sockets. The electricity from power sockets is linked to low-frequency electromagnetic fields. Alternatively, you can unplug them each night. Remember to plug them back first thing in the morning!

Sleep on a mattress without metal springs. 

Get mattress without metal springs

Metal springs in most mattresses can act as an antenna that magnifies EMF emissions from television radiation (if you have a TV in your bedroom) or any object producing electromagnetic waves. Opt for a mattress that has springs individually encased in fabric or latex mattresses. 

Getha Compass Luxury Mattresses

Pulling the plug on EMF may be your ticket to a restful sleep each night. Depending on the source of EMF emission and how frequent we are exposed to it, the level of adverse effects of electromagnetic radiation on humans varies. To further minimise the exposure to radiation, the Getha Compass Series feature luxury mattresses with a new innovative Biocare sleep system to create a magnetic barrier that intercepts 98.5% of EMF during sleep.


 

Getha’s EMF-free Compass luxury mattresses are available in three types of firmness, which are: 

Compass Gold 100 Mattress (firm plush)

 Compass Gold 100 Mattress - EMF Protection
- 7 Layers of 100% Premium Natural Latex
- Top Cover - Japanese Wild Tussah Silk


Compass Green Mattress (super soft)

 Compass Green Mattress - EMF Protection
- European Talalay 100% Natural Latex
- Top Cover - Soft Touch Viscose Cotton


Compass Star Mattress (medium-firm)

 Compass Star Mattress - EMF Protection
- 3 in 1 combination: 100% Natural Latex, Rubberised Coconut Fibre & Ozone Foam
- Top Cover - Soft Touch Viscose Cotton


Find out more by contacting the Getha team today!

 Speak to our Sleep Consultants


Sources

1.Wilson, D. R. (2019, March 8). Should you be worried about EMF exposure? https://www.healthline.com/health/emf#types
2.International Agency for Research on Cancer. (2011, May 31). IARC classifies radiofrequency electromagnetic fields as possibly carcinogenic to humans [Press release]. https://www.iarc.who.int/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/pr208_E.pdf
3.CNRS (Délégation Paris Michel-Ange). (2009, June 23). Melatonin: The fountain of youth? https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090622064807.htm
4.Halgamuge, M. N. (2012, Oct 10). Pineal melatonin level disruption in humans due to electromagnetic fields and ICNIRP limits. https://academic.oup.com/rpd/article-abstract/154/4/405/1599058